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Rockville, MD


Rockville, MD

Rockville is the county seat of Montgomery County, Maryland, United States. It is a major incorporated city in the central part of Montgomery County and forms part of the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area. According to estimates conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for a 12-month period ending 1 July 2008, the city's population is 60,734, making it the second largest incorporated city in Maryland, behind Baltimore.Rockville, along with neighboring Gaithersburg and Bethesda, is at the core of the Interstate 270 Technology Corridor which is home to numerous software and biotechnology companies as well as several federal government institutions. The city also has several upscale regional shopping centers and is one of the major retail hubs in Montgomery County.

Rockville is the fifth largest city in Maryland and is the county seat of Montgomery County. It occupies 13.03 square miles within the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area and is located 12 miles northwest of the nation’s capital. A major portion of the prestigious I-270 corridor is within the City’s corporate limits.

The City of Rockville operates under the council-manager form of municipal government and derives its governing authority from a charter granted by the General Assembly of Maryland. The governing body is the Mayor and Council, which formulates policies for the administration of the City. The Mayor and Council are comprised of a mayor and four councilmembers elected at large for a two-year term. The mayor is chosen on a separate ballot. The city manager is appointed by the Mayor and Council to serve as the City’s chief executive officer. As mandated by state law, Montgomery County provides school, library, social services, and fire protection in Rockville. In addition to the Montgomery County Police, Rockville residents are served by the City’s own Police Department. Rockville’s community policing services are specially designed to meet the needs of the community. The Rockville Volunteer Fire Department, consisting of 100 paid professional and 187 volunteer fire fighters, provides fire protection to Rockville.
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Demographics

As of the 2005 census update, there are 53,710 people in 21,895 households living within the boundaries of the city. These figures are an increase from the earlier 2000 census, which cited a total population of 47,388 people, 17,247 households, and 12,003 families residing in the city.

The population density is 3,524.1 inhabitants per square mile (1,360.7 /km2). There are 17,786 housing units at an average density of 1,322.7 per square mile (510.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the city is 67.78% White, 9.11% African American, 0.34% Native American, 14.83% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 4.78% from other races, and 3.13% from two or more races. 11.67% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

In addition to North Potomac, MD with a 27.59% Asian population and Potomac, MD with close to 15%, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Rockville is home to one of the largest Chinese communities in Maryland.[citation needed] According to the U.S. Census conducted in 2000, 14.5% of North Potomac's residents identified themselves as being of Chinese ancestry, making North Potomac the area with the highest percentage of Chinese ancestry in any place besides California and Hawaii. According to the Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) enrollment demographic statistics, the two high schools in Montgomery County with the highest reported Asian ancestry are Thomas S. Wootton High School in Rockville, MD with a 32.1% Asian population and caters to the communities in North Potomac, Rockville, and Potomac, MD, and Winston Churchill High School in Potomac, MD with a 23.0% Asian population. Although North Potomac and Potomac have the highest concentration of Asian population in Maryland, the areas are largely residential and consist of suburban subdivisions. Thus, the more commercially favorable Rockville has become the center for Chinese/Taiwanese businesses since it is the county seat of Montgomery County and has large economic activity along Rockville Pike/Wisconsin Avenue (MD Route 355) in addition to having its own middle class and upscale residential areas. Rockville is widely considered to be a "Little Taipei" due to the area's high concentration of Taiwanese immigrants.

Rockville is also the center of the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Area's Jewish population, containing several synagogues, kosher restaurants, and the largest of the Washington area's three Jewish community centers, part of a complex which includes a Jewish nursing home, day school, theater, and educational facility. There are also high percentages of Jewish population in the surrounding areas of North Potomac and Potomac, which are largely residential and not as commercially suitable as Rockville. The city also has large Korean and Indian populations.

There are 17,247 households, of which 33.0% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.6% are married couples living together, 9.5% have a female householder with no husband present, and 30.4% are non-families. 23.8% of all households are single-person and 8.9% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.65 and the average family size is 3.13.

In the city the population is spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 32.1% from 25 to 44, 24.4% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 38 years. For every 100 females there are 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 92.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city as of 2007 is $86,085. As of 2007, the median income for a family was $98,257. Males have a median income of $53,764 versus $38,788 for females. The per capita income for the city is $30,518. 7.8% of the population and 5.6% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 8.9% of those under the age of 18 and 7.9% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.
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The Outdoors

From the 1960s, Rockville's town center, formerly one of the area's commercial centers, suffered from a period of decline.

Rockville soon became the first city in Maryland to enter into a government funded urban renewal program. This resulted in the demolition of most of the original business district. Included in the plan was the unsuccessful Rockville Mall, which failed to attract either major retailers or customers and was demolished in 1994, various government buildings such as the new Montgomery County Judicial Center, and a reorganization of the road plan near the Courthouse. Unfortunately, the once-promising plan was for the most part a disappointment. Although efforts to restore the town center continue, the majority of the city's economic activity has since relocated along Rockville Pike (MD Route 355/Wisconsin Avenue).

In 2004, Rockville Mayor Larry Giammo announced plans to renovate the Rockville Town Square, including building new stores and housing and relocating the city's library. In the past year, the new Rockville Town Center has been transformed and includes a number of boutique-like stores, restaurants, condominiums and apartments, as well as stages, fountains and the Rockville Library. The headquarters of the U.S. Public Health Service is on Montrose Road while the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's headquarters is just south of the City's coporate limits.

The city is closely associated with the neighboring towns of Kensington and the unincorporated census-designated place, North Bethesda. The Music Center at Strathmore, an arts and theater center, opened in February 2005 in the latter of these two areas and is presently the second home of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and the Fitzgerald Theatre in Rockville Civic Center Park has provided diverse entertainment since 1960. In 1998, Regal Cinemas opened in Town Center. The city also has a brass band in the British style. The REM song (Don't Go Back To) Rockville released in 1984 was written by Mike Mills about not wanting his girlfriend to return to Rockville, Maryland.